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Airplane Travel with Baby

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Updated July 02, 2014

Mother and her baby boy playing on the plane
Emmanuel Aguirre/Photographer's Choice/Getty Images

Question
We’re about to take our first airplane trip with our one-year-old. We flew quite a bit before she was born, but now we’re not sure what to pack or how to make this trip successful.

Learn about it
Even if you racked up your share of frequent flyer miles before your baby was born, forget what you know of travel so far. Flying with a little one is a whole different story.

If you fear turning into one of those families we've all met aboard planes — those with squalling, unruly, squirming children who tend to bring out the same traits in their fellow passengers — take heart. My oldest child, Angela was just 14 days old when she took her first flight, and since then, I’ve taken many more trips with my four children. I know that you can travel with your little ones and enjoy the process. Forethought and preparation are the keys.

Planning the trip
The details of your trip often can mean the difference between success and disaster. Keep these ideas in mind as you plan:

  • Examine all aspects of the journey when you book your flights. Aim for direct flights so that you can avoid changing planes. If you have to make a change, avoid short layovers that give you too little time to get from gate to gate, and conversely avoid long layovers that require lots of idle time in airports.

  • When you make your reservations, give the agent the ages of all passengers. You may learn some important rules such as:

  • FAA regulations allow only one lap-child per adult. If you are traveling with two children, and only one adult, one child will require a seat of his own. (Not that you would want to travel with two children on your lap!)

  • Some airlines do not allow newborns to fly, check on age requirements.

  • Some airlines offer discounted prices for children’s tickets.

  • Most airplanes have only one extra oxygen mask in each row, which means you can only seat one lap-child in each row. If two adults are traveling with two children, consider sitting across the aisle from each other, or two behind two.

  • Some airlines count carseats or strollers as extra baggage.

  • If your child falls asleep easily and stays asleep, try scheduling travel for during your child’s nap or sleep times. If you have a finicky sleeper, on the other hand, avoid traveling during usual sleep times, as your baby may just stay fussy and awake.

  • Reserve your seats in advance to be sure your entire party sits together.

  • If you have an infant, ask for the bulkhead (front row) and request a bassinet.

  • Contrary to popular advice, I think it’s best to avoid the bulkhead with older babies and toddlers, because these seats offer neither under-seat space nor seat pocket, so you'll have to store all your toys and supplies in the overhead compartment. Also, in the bulkhead, the food tray pops up from the armrest, effectively trapping you in your seat when your table is laden with food.

  • Don’t put your child in the aisle seat, as the food cart and passengers carrying luggage could injure your child.

    By Elizabeth Pantley, Author of the No-Cry Sleep Solution and Gentle Baby Care

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